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20100901
20100930
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that with a guest from "the washington post." he also plans to meet with local families in richmond, virginia, and iowa, to talk about the economy, and do some more campaigning here at home and washington. on friday, a ceremony for justice elena kagan that the supreme court. speaking of the supreme court's newest justice, "usa today" reports that she first is -- faces the first supreme court test today. where with no law clerks are sectors present, to decide which cases to take up later how they should be resolved. and a first of the private sessions for the new term, which officially begins october 4, they will slip through thousands of appeals filed over the summer to decide which should be job -- granted hearings. the conference room is where all of the most and poor decisions of the most and poor decisions are made and they are made by the nine justices and no one else -- the most important decisions are made and they are made by the nine justices and no one else. many justices speak about how intimidating the first sessions can be. in hawaii justice anthony kennedy says the first confere
tomorrow afternoon, heading from iowa to virginia." with a theme throughout the papers this morning, divided government. a response to the president's weekly radio address yesterday, "can the two parties work together in the next congress"? for republicans, 202-737-0001. for democrats, 202-737-0002. for independents, 202-628-0205. yesterday from "the washington post," based on a weekly radio address and internet address yesterday -- host: also this morning, "politics and policy." host: we will get your phone calls in a moment, but first year is the president yesterday in his weekly address. >> many of the republican leaders were amongst the architects of the failed policy. grounded in the same moral philosophy, cut the taxes for millionaires and billionaires, cut the rules for wall street, cut loose the middle class to fend for itself. that is the echo of a disastrous decade that we cannot afford to relive. host: paul pearson has this, "cough up in the middle. what is a president who do"? "had the president realized earlier that he never could have won over corporate america, he nev
, the previous generation. host: nelson from west virginia. if you are from generation x, or generation y, we want to hear from you, since you will be in europe in the world -- you will be inheriting the world from the baby boom generation. and those folks that came out of the world war ii years, if you would like to talk about the baby boomers and what you left them, that would be an interesting conversation as well. the next call is from wisconsin, ron on the democrats line. ron, what generation are you in? caller: high may boomer -- i'm a boomer, born in 1947 and i think the article is way off balance. i think the contribution of the boomers goes beyond any of the other generations in the fact that people nowadays can actually say no, instead of just marching in lockstep with what happened up until the 1960's. we could say, hey, wait a second, something is wrong, and to make changes. and these changes really shaped present generations. and i think if anything, the present generation are the ones that are released boyle, undereducated, and really do not have a direction. -- are really spoil
you think -- host: next call is richmond, virginia. go ahead. caller: what does your guest think china's preference would be? what would china like to see happen? guest: they have been relatively quiet. they are hesitant to press north korea. they see that as an internal development. china's greater concern is north korea's behavior. they continue to play like north korea's lawyer in the u.n. council. they are trying to be on both sides of the fence at the same time. they are trying to say they are behaving as a responsibly stake holder at the same time, they undermine the affect of the u.n. sanctions to get north korea to abide by the sanctions and give up weapons. host: north texas on the republican line. caller: good morning. they had a nuclear test in some cave up north. are they really a nreally a power? guest: they did have an unsuccessful test but they have unsuccessful test but they have had a successful test. we know they are able to test a device. there's uncertainty to the degree to which they've weaponized. most don't think they have miniaturized any warhead so it wo
troops in afghanistan. virginia, the plan, democrats line. go ahead. caller: i am from new york. shall i speak up? host: go ahead. caller: i think he should turn the page. it should have been turned a long time ago. but i do not think the media will let him because they just keep the war is going. let me say this because i tried so hard to get on to you -- george washington's farewell address. he answered many of the questions facing us. telling us we should be aware -- host: sorry, we will have to let you go. your signal is breaking up. here's more from the president last night. >> we must use all elements of all power, including our diplomacy, economic strength, and the power of america as an example to secure our interests and stand by our allies. and we must reject a vision of the future that is based not just on our fearless but also on our hopes. division that recognizes the real dangers that exist around the world but also the limitless possibilities of our time. today, old adversaries are at peace and emerging democracies are potential partners. new markets for our goods stretch
. virginia, go ahead. caller: hi. i wanted to speak on nancy pelosi in support of her voice for aiding the people. one of the things that i think that has happened is the republicans have controlled the message. however, at the end of the day when it comes time for them to stand forth for the voting, people are going to find out that the republicans are selling a product without instructions. and that is going to be detrimental to them and their message that they've been continuing to churn out. it's a marketing ploy. and it's a very good one at this moment, but i think when if educated population decides to actually tune back in and say let's get on the band wagon they're going to find out that the republicans have been selling poison to the people. host: so you're saying thingless change as we get close to november caller: absolutely. i don't necessarily believe in all polls. i do watch them. but i do believe that there is an issue right now with the people that they're calling. i don't think that every person's household has been called and i think they're targeting certain areas to
of virginia vargas, james madison, the pink anies of south carolina. charles cokes worth and challs, king of massachusetts, zander hamilton of new york. benjamin franklin and thomas, robert morris of pennsylvania. morris of pennsylvania. and william patterson of new jersey. some of the names we still remember in history of signing the constitution. next telephone call fro charlotte, north carolina. good morning on this constitution day as we ask you whether or not you believe in original meaning or the living document. ivan, democrat's line. caller: let's take the original intent and work with that. because that is where the disagreement is. the reason why there's even a debate is because what is the founding philosophy that governs the constitution is the acquisition of property. the central focus of the constitution is a concern over properties. what makes this such -- what makes or gives this the character of a living document or original intent is the idea of slave enrichment slavery has 10 pro vigs and the most engrossed element of the constitution. they were concerned about establis
for a tuesday showdown when there will be republican opposition. west virginia, next. west virginia, next. caller: i think stephen colbert is an american and he has a right to say what he wants to say. that is how the man gets his views across. host: the fact that he is a celebrity -- caller: why shouldn't he? we say what we want to said. why can he say what he wants to say? host: people talked about his qualifications and talking about this issue. caller: that is how he gets what you want to say across. if you watch his show, which i do, him and jon stewart bring things to the forefront. they do it in a comical way. many people don't get it. we are all going to get a lot of field jaws because republicans are leading us down that path. there is such a gap between poor people and rich people is that we will need those jobs and fighting immigrants for those jobs if large class people don't wake up and vote. wake up and vote. host: new york , our republican line per caller: good morning. celebritiesk that should be in position to make comments all over the place. i believe that we are in thi
and everything will trickle down. >> the candidates running in the virginia race are tom periello freshman democrat, elected in a wave of victories during obama's victory in 2008, and against him is challenger robert -- republican state senator from chatham, the seventh part of the district, and jeff parker, tea party member and independent businessman from the danville area. this race is getting a lot of national attention because republicans see periello as one of the most vulnerable democrats in congress, he represents a somewhat conservative district and he voted in favor of obama's major initiatives -- health care, capt. trade, stimulus, so on. and two years ago he was elected by the smallest margin of any congressional race in the country. they think -- the republicans are seeing this as a pickup but democrats, however, say tom perriello is a fighter, very tough campaigner and because he supported the same initiatives that he is getting support of national democrats just like national republicans are trying to taken down. in 2008, perriello, a young lawyer from charlottesville, he ch
on to virginia. republican line. good morning. caller: yes. we have where i live at we have three pen ten sharies here and there's over a thousand inmates there. and the state -- the tax people pay i hear anywhere from $16,000 to $25,000 a year. and that's not right for us to pay that kind of money for -- to how's those inmates. host: how many jobs do you think those three produce for that area? caller: very few. host: whether or not do you say that? caller: because it's a low income county and stuff. the only thing that keeps our county going is the coal mines and stuff. host: ok. did you have more to add? caller: i would just like, like i said, $25,000 that taxpayers pay to keep the inmate in jail. and just like i said, they need to get those inmates out and bring our soldiers back home from afghanistan and train those prisoners over there for two or three weeks and send them over there. host: according to the national public radio, in 2006 the it cost about $68 billion for corrections. the average cost per state inmate was $22,000 or about $62 per day among facilities operated by the federal b
and like the gentleman in west virginia. that would be negative. the gentleman in kentucky that is not here visiting, the democrats do not have to pray that it will be 1994 and more because it will be more of the depression we were headed for. was it enough? host: can i ask you, how is the senate race looking in pennsylvania? at the plant to vote? caller: i think the republicans are in for a big surprise. the callers wanted to know why your show lanes towards the democrats. it does not. i think it is buried there. you do not have republicans calling in. i think there are some republicans out there like myself. we have seen what they had done to this country. eight years was enough. host: the financial times says the attention is turning to al mr. obama will turn towards divided government. the parallel is when it did gingrich seized control. his party had been in the minority for the previous four years and over reached. he deprived the government of day today funding. the public blamed the republicans for the shutdown. the president regained the initiative and was reelected one year later.
is something that we have to debate about, but i do not believe in sanctuaries. host: alexandria, virginia. oscar, democratic line. caller: i just came to the united states. i am a legal resident now. before people talk about the eagles not paying taxes -- talk about illegals not paying taxes , we do not steal the numbers, we just invent them. in my case i work for seven years with a fake number that they took. for seven years i have worked, i will never get the money with my three jobs and we do pay taxes. inform yourself. you will understand that most undocumented people do pay taxes. make sure that the criminals do not get any identification in your passage of this law. the people that have worked really hard to put food on the table for their families, but they wanted an opportunity. forgive them. those k -- host: ok. congressman? guest: becoming a naturalized citizen, i understand what he is saying. but what you are saying validates what i have been saying. looking as social security, the last numbers i saw were over $4 billion there, people like yourselves that i put money in and pro
. alexandria, virginia. democrats line. you are on. go ahead, please. ellis, speak up or we have to move on. caller: i am speaking up. host: what do you have to say? caller: nobody should be too big to fail. host: de have anything more to add? caller: the reason i think these people should be allowed to fail is because already the government has already bailed them out. and at this point, we are still working on bailing them out, yet they don't seem to be helping anybody else out here in this economy right now. and they are actively lobbying right now in congress to try to get to -- republicans get back to office. part of this deal. it is all partisan. and it is all about politics. and what is going to come down to in the end is they say they don't want it to be failing -- ok, the republicans don't, but yet the democrats are saying they are trying to restrict this now so nobody can be too big to fail. and what we will end up is these big companies are going to get their money back, they will all buy into their way and they will -- obviously what we are looking at, where we were before. then
that is from tuesday. virginia. brian, republican. go ahead. caller: first-time caller. i would like to comment a little bit about congress. i have listened to a couple of the comments made this morning. the problem we have right now is that republicans and democrats cannot get together on any issue that we have relating to this country. it is a shame that they can't do that. and i think that this health care reform that they have passed, that the democrats have passed, has really affected our country and has affected me also as a citizen. it because i am a police officer. -- because i am a police officer, and just this year alone might premiums, ever since they passed the health care plan, my premiums have gone up twice. actually talking about going up again in -- where it. costs -- going up begin in january. this is the biggest reason premiums i have never had and i have been a lot enforcement 22 years. it's, you work for the city? is it -- host: do you work for the city? is it the city paying less or the premiums going up to the cause has increased to both? caller: well, the blue cross and b
: richmond, virginia, 35 years old. go ahead. go ahead. caller: yes . i am 35 and i work with -- i have been voting since clinton, i think, came in. i think that young people are not as informed as they used the. -- as they used to be. even older than i am, there were civics.in school about si guest: civics education in our schools has been systematically cut over the last 30 years. but that is not so you can blame young people about. that is an issue of where we investing resources, where are we investing in the young people? we have a program called democracy class that is available to teachers around the country, if they want a one- classroom curriculum. it should be significantly more than that. but young people are savvy. they are paying attention. we see they are following the news closely than they have in many years. i think that is what is causing some of the cynicism. they are starting to pay attention. they see that their interests are being cut by others or by corporate or special interests at times. they are savvy right now, especially with the internet, to actually find out inf
: virginia beach, mark, independent line. caller: i am starting to get involved in politics and things like that i am finding it hard to comprehend because you're saying you cannot talk reveal private investments that you are getting of millions and millions of dollars, but again, you owe so much money and [unintelligible] and the federal government goes and punishes because they've made their money probably and kept it to themselves. where are you getting all of this money from? host: michael, we've got your point. let me show the viewers the headline in "usa today." ehab line is that mid debt -- midterm campaign war chests are crammed. guest: we were looking at a billion dollars election cycle back in march and that was kind of a trajectory of spending in the elections of a last several cycles, not taking into account the fact that the recent decision could unleash a far more money in the election cycle. we were looking at a baseline spending, which would still be 30% above the previous midterm with the success by the candidates and these interest groups. i think the press will be far hig
first call comes from richmond, virginia. randy on our line for republicans. caller: i have a question -- or a common. -- comment. i wanted to give you a personal compliments on your last segment. you were very professional -- not just cracking of about the planets alignments on september 50. host: thank you a lot. thank you for your questions or comments. caller: i saw on msnbc about the secretary of labor was talking about the large portion of money being invested in this high tech training. doing some investments there. i work in a very high tech field and i have been unemployed for over eight months. i have plenty of security. my question is, how do you think that will trace how those funds will help of the lower income, or as you were saying, just high-school educated person in the workforce? i believe it would be a good step, but it will not help anything in the here and now to get any kind of education in the high-tech industry -- you at least need a four-year degree. guest: that is true. if you are looking in the high- tech industry in particular, most of those jobs to require
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17